Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Clovers

Shamrock Bulletin Logo

BLIZZARD, Shamrock Bulletin Headquarters – Everyone in the Club Penguin army community recognizes the clover as the symbol of the mighty Army of Club Penguinbut did you know these ten fun facts about the iconic plant?

#1: For every four-leaf clover, there are about 10,000 three-leaf clovers.

Managing and Treating Spinal Muscular Atrophy | Everyday Health

If you ever wondered what the odds of finding a four-leaf clover in a sea of three-leaf clovers are, they’re literally 1 in 10,000! That’s only a 0.0001% chance! It’s no wonder finding a four-leaf clover is considered “lucky” because there’s a less than 1% chance of doing so!

#2: Clover plants that naturally produce four leaves don’t exist; that’s why four-leaf clovers are so rare.

Question Mark Background Vector Art, Icons, and Graphics for Free Download

Now this is crazy! If this is the case, then four-leaf clovers themselves shouldn’t exist. But they do, so how is that possible? Genetic mutations or defects? Environmental factors? Who knows?

#3: The Celtic people saw the four-leaf clover as a good-luck charm that granted magical protection.

Real Four Leaf Clover Celtic Knot Pendant Authentic 4 Leaf | Etsy

As statistically “lucky” as it is to find a four-leaf clover, the idea of the four-leaf clover being lucky is actually of Celtic origin. The Celts thought that a four-leaf clover had magical powers that warded off bad luck. This magical talisman concept was taken a step further by children in the Middle Ages, who believed that carrying a four-leaf clover around would allow them to see fairies. That would definitely be the Army of Club Penguin‘s idea of a fairy tale!

#4: The leaves on a four-leaf clover have been said to stand for faith, hope, love, and luck.

Screenshot 2021-05-26 200940

As with so many things in nature, the four-leaf clover holds symbolic meaning. In this case, it’s the three virtues of faith, hope, and love, and a little luck thrown in there, too. Nice little morality lesson and bonus luck!

#5: The phrase “luck of the Irish” originates from the saying that more four-leaf clovers can be found in Ireland than in any other place in the world.

Luck Of The Irish In Shamrock Circle Frame Stock Illustration -  Illustration of green, decoration: 110467424

Ever wondered why it’s always the luck of the Irish when it comes to clovers? There’s your answer! While it has often been said that Ireland is home to more four-leaf clovers than anywhere else, nobody knows whether that’s actually true or not. Do you think we’ll ever find out?

#6: The first literary reference to the four-leaf clover’s luck-bringing ability was made by Sir John Melton in 1620.

John Melton High Resolution Stock Photography and Images - Alamy

The belief that four-leaf clovers bring good luck has been around for centuries, if not millennia, thanks to the Celts, but this concept wasn’t mentioned in any literary context until 1620, when English merchant, politician, and writer Sir John Melton wrote, “If a man walking in the fields find any four-leaved grass, he shall in a small while after find some good thing.” Pretty cool how people of other cultures accepted the Celts’ belief of the four-leaf clover being lucky back then!

#7: It’s said that if you give someone a four-leaf clover immediately after you find it, your luck will double.

Brilliant Sparkle 81 X2 Clipart - Full Size Clipart (#272987) - PinClipart

What an incentive to be generous to others! We’ve all heard “sharing is caring,” but this? No way! Could this belief being inadvertently put into practice by the Army of Club Penguin‘s clover system possibly be the reason why we have never lost a war in the CPPS Era?

#8: Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, carried a four-leaf clover with him everywhere he went for good luck, but he didn’t have it with him on the night he was assassinated.

Abraham Lincoln - Wikipedia

Bet you didn’t know this about Honest Abe! Apparently, he was another person who believed in the four-leaf clover being lucky! It’s so sad that Mr. Lincoln met his end the one time he didn’t bring his lucky clover with him. Can you imagine how things would’ve turned out if the President did have his four-leaf clover with him on the night he was assassinated?

#9: The idiom “in clover” is a reference to the four-leaf clover being a sign of good luck.

In Clover idiom Archives - English Idioms & Slang Dictionary

Ever heard someone say that they or someone else is in clover? That idiom means that one is living an easy, comfortable, prosperous, happy, and/or carefree life. That’s something we all wish we could have!

#10: Contrary to popular belief, clovers and shamrocks aren’t the same thing; only three-leaf clovers are shamrocks, not both three-leaf and four-leaf clovers.

How did the shamrock become so lucky? | Explore | Awesome Activities & Fun  Facts | CBC Kids

Yikes, talk about culture shock! Definitely an awkward thing to talk about on the Shamrock Bulletin, but it’s true. Only the common three-leaf clover should be called a shamrock. Well, what in the world are we supposed to call the lucky four-leaf clover, then? We’re definitely open to ideas!

What do YOU think? Which of these clover fun facts blew your mind? Let us know down in the comments below!

ACP Blog Signature

ShadowSaint

ACP Moderator & Shamrock Bulletin Reporter

Information Sources: https://www.bhg.com/holidays/st-patricks-day/traditions/fun-facts-about-four-leaf-clovers/, https://www.frankieflowers.com/10-fun-facts-about-four-leaf-clovers, and http://justfunfacts.com/interesting-facts-about-clovers/

Image Source: Google Images

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: